Potomac Conference

Story by Alisi Potauaine / Originally Published by the Potomac Conference

Sifa Potauaine, associate pastor of Potomac Conference’s Beltsville (Md.) church, believes innovation is an essential key to life. “We have to adjust to circumstances that are outside of our control—like this pandemic,” he says. “When we cannot actively participate in an act of service, we have to think differently. The Beltsville church is committed to help people in whatever way we can can in whatever circumstances we face.”

Listening to a group of middle- to high school-aged girls talking in the potluck line,  Jeanene Medley, a member of Potomac Conference's Capital Memorial church in Washington, D.C., heard a small voice ask, “Who is taking these girls under their wing?” It was in this moment that Medley felt called to develop a mentorship program built on the pillars of faith, empowerment, love and sisterhood.

Image by sspiehs3 on Pixabay

Will Johns, Pastor of Potomac Conference's Beltsville church's Tech Road Campus in Silver Spring, Md., shared the following message, encouraging us to care for our souls during this tough time.

I have been thinking about this question: What is the best way to respond to what we are currently facing? I think the answer to that question for me is soul care.

Let me explain what I mean.

Image by Tumisu on Pixabay

Story by Tiffany Doss

Most podcast listeners dread the moment they hit the wall, bingeing and replaying all their favorite subscribed shows. Potomac is excited to remedy that situation by introducing a new podcast called Potomac People.

Potomac People launched earlier this year and aims to highlight various individuals within the conference through interview-style and storytelling programming. The show compiles some of the most interesting back- stories new to most listeners.

Feature by Edwin Manuel Garcia

Therezinha Barbalho grew up in Brazil and wanted to be a pastor more than anything. But after graduating from the Adventist seminary, she faced difficulty finding pastoral employment beyond being a Bible worker, due to the region’s attitudes toward women in ministry.

She realized her dream career wasn’t going to happen, so she went back to school and became a lawyer.

Years later when Barbalho and her husband sought better medical care than Brazil could offer for their daughter who has autism, she sent her pastoral résumé to conferences in the United States. She was offered a job as a Bible worker at New Jersey Conference’s Luso-Brazilian church in Newark in 2004, then promptly became the associate pastor.