Mountain View Conference

Hispanic camp meeting, Moorefield

Story by Walter Cardenas

Perhaps some think of “the church” as simply the building where they worship. That term has taken on new meaning as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. A building is not necessary for ministry to take place. The Seventh-day Adventist Church has found new and innovative ways to worship and reach out to others through phone calls, Zoom meetings and social media.

The Spanish-speaking members in Mountain View Conference’s territory have had many different needs. Local pastors and members have purchased groceries and offered financial assistance for those who have lost jobs. Volunteers have also taken them grocery shopping and have served as translators at doctor’s appointments.

Story by Valerie Morikone

Mountain View Conference member Charles Kilgore’s story involves many broken pieces, yet, throughout, God’s hand was on his life and brought about his return to the Seventh-day Adventist church of his childhood.

Growing up in Charleston, W.Va., I attended Charleston Junior Academy, an Adventist elementary school. At the age of 11, I was baptized by Pastor Kenneth Taylor of the Charleston church, following a series of meetings held by Joe Crews. School friends, loving teachers, church fellowship and the Pathfinder club positively impacted my life, yet there was no Christian influence at home.

Photo by Crissy Musick

Feature by Edwin Manuel Garcia / Photos by Crissy Musick

Chris Trent truly understands church members who are struggling with issues, big and small.

“My childhood was rough. ... My sister was abused, so I guess she passed some of that abuse to me,” says the pastor of Mountain View Conference’s aptly named Grace Outreach church in Logan, W.Va., and the Grace Community church in Williamson, W.Va. “I was taken to church quite often when I was a kid, so I thought there was a God, but, at the time, I didn’t have a need for God.”

Trent is a former Marine who owned a tattoo business for 13 years. “And in between,” he adds, “I was married and had three kids by a woman who was kind of wild. We were into drugs a little bit.”

Story by Valerie Morikone

With the support of its school board and church family, Mountain View Conference's Parkersburg Academy has made a bold move in their school program this year. They are offering a non-conventional kindergarten through second-grade education called “Forest Classroom”—a classroom in the woods with no walls or artificial lights.

Under the leadership of principal/teacher Monica Zill, who implemented this program, Julie Henson teaches this classroom out in nature.

The Forest Classroom offers students an opportunity to be children, to play, explore and take risks. Being outdoors in the richness of God’s nature offers support for health, emotional, physical, social and cognitive development that an indoor environment cannot reach, says Henson.

Dave Weigley and Emmanuel Asiedu flank conferences presidents and WAU president after the Columbia Union Ex Committee voted to revert funds to the conferences and WAU

Story by V. Michelle Bernard

“We believe in sharing God’s blessings with our entities,” said Columbia Union Conference Treasurer Emmanuel Asiedu. “[We] want to give $550,000 back to our entities to support the mission. [We’re] giving the money now so we can share the blessings now.”