Chesapeake Conference

Story by V. Michelle Bernard / Photos by Andre Hastick

According to the Pew Research Center, nearly 78 percent of the world’s population is unable to worship their God in whatever way they see fit.  

Today, on Religious Freedom Day, local faith and civic leaders gathered at the North American Division (NAD) Headquarters in Columbia Md., for the NAD’s first Religious Freedom Prayer Breakfast. They celebrated the freedoms enjoyed in the United States and prayed for guidance in further fostering and sharing it with others. 

Story by Andre Hastick

During the recent Reach Chesapeake coordinated evangelistic campaign, 23 Hispanic churches throughout the Chesapeake Conference participated in spreading the Adventist message of hope in their respective communities.

In preparation for the meetings, each Hispanic congregation engaged their community through small groups, says Pastor Orlando Rosales, director of Multilingual Ministries for Chesapeake. These Biblebased small groups met in members’ homes and focused on felt needs of friends and family members. After the small group gelled, members invited participants to an evangelistic series. This served as a natural bridge for recently connected newcomers.

Photo Jesus Joseph Mary Color by Barta IV from Flickr

Editorial by Rick Remmers

Jesus’ birth is the most important birth of all the billions that have taken place through earth’s history. His life, death and resurrection are at the center of the plan of salvation and our hope for eternity.

Jesus’ birth gives significance to every other birth on this planet. Every child that is born has infinite value because of His advent. As the people of God, we recognize this importance and choose to value every young person as well.

At the Chesapeake Conference, we have made ministry to children and youth a high priority. We invest time, resources, creativity and energy into a wide range of ministries to reach every child of God.

Photo by Tama66 on Pixabay

Story by V. Michelle Bernard

After a 30-hour trip, the familiar smell and taste of food at the hospital canteen in Nepal was very comforting and reassuring to Fylvia Fowler Kline’s family, who had just arrived as missionaries from the U.S. The cafeteria delivered a plate of pakoras, an Indian snack made of vegetable chickpea fritters similar to falafels.

“Getting adjusted to a new cuisine is one of the challenges of mission service. But, it wasn’t for us,” says Kline, who adds that Nepalese food is in influenced by the flavors of India and Tibet, similar to what she ate growing up.

Story by V. Michelle Bernard

People come in on Sabbath morning, and the tables are set up, and the classrooms are ready. They don’t know how it happens. It’s like a little Sabbath fairy comes in and sets it all up,” says Roxann Gambin, organizer of Chesapeake Conference’s Triadelphia church potluck for 12 years.

Gambin likes to operate behind the scenes. She and her husband, Len, volunteer at the church, located in Clarksville, Md., each Friday to set up the fellowship hall and prepare the kitchen. She schedules teams to run the weekly potlucks. The Sabbaths her team isn’t serving, she still often helps by dropping by the kitchen before Sabbath School and in between church to heat up and prepare dishes. The Gambins often stay until 3 p.m. to clean.