Who We Are, How We Serve

The Columbia Union Conference coordinates the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s work in the Mid-Atlantic United States, where 145,000 members worship in 800 congregations. We provide administrative support to eight conferences, two healthcare networks, 81 elementary and secondary schools, a liberal arts university, a health sciences college, a dozen community services centers, six book and health food stores and a radio station.

Mission Values Priorities

We Believe

God is love, power, and splendor—and God is a mystery. His ways are far beyond us, but He still reaches out to us. God is infinite yet intimate, three yet one,
all-knowing yet all-forgiving.

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Story by Andre Hastick

During the recent Reach Chesapeake coordinated evangelistic campaign, 23 Hispanic churches throughout the Chesapeake Conference participated in spreading the Adventist message of hope in their respective communities.

In preparation for the meetings, each Hispanic congregation engaged their community through small groups, says Pastor Orlando Rosales, director of Multilingual Ministries for Chesapeake. These Biblebased small groups met in members’ homes and focused on felt needs of friends and family members. After the small group gelled, members invited participants to an evangelistic series. This served as a natural bridge for recently connected newcomers.

 

Story by LaTasha Hewitt

Emil Peeler, pastor of the Capitol Hill church in Washington, D.C., felt that although there were a lot of solid Bible study resources available, there was need for a fresh, concise and simple approach. Consequently, FaithFacts (pictured) was birthed. “I specifically designed them to be used for baptismal preparation and as introductory studies for those new in their Christian journey,” says Peeler.

Story by Betty Klinck

Adventist HealthCare Washington Adventist Hospital is the first hospital in Maryland to offer an alternative approach to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a less invasive procedure to replace a damaged heart valve without open-heart surgery. The new method, called transcaval TAVR, will expand the minimally invasive benefits of TAVR to more people with valve disease.